35 kg 210 g de nourriture | LES RESTOS DU CŒUR


Merci pour votre générosité !

35 kg 210 g de nourriture récoltes pour les Restos du Coeur. Merci aux étudiants de French in Normandy!

LES RESTOS DU CŒUR

Fondés par Coluche en 1985, les Restos du Cœur est une association loi de 1901, reconnue d’utilité publique, sous le nom officiel de « les Restaurants du Cœur – les Relais du Cœur ». Ils ont pour but « d’aider et d’apporter une assistance bénévole aux personnes démunies, notamment dans le domaine alimentaire par l’accès à des repas gratuits, et par la participation à leur insertion sociale et économique, ainsi qu’à toute action contre la pauvreté sous toutes ses formes ».

Presque 30 ans plus tard, ce sont 130 millions de repas équilibrés qui sont distribués par l’association (2012-2013). Les Restos du Cœur ont malheureusement largement franchi la barre d’un milliard de repas servis depuis leur création…

Aujourd’hui, les carences alimentaires les plus graves ont presque disparu, mais la pauvreté a pris un autre visage : accidents de la vie, contrats précaires et travailleurs pauvres, jeunes de moins de 25 ans ne disposant pas du RSA, retraités disposant du seul “minimum vieillesse”…

En France, plus de 8 millions de personnes vivent sous le seuil de pauvreté. Source : Rapport INSEE sur la précarité en France du 30 août 2011 (chiffres INSEE 2009)

Au-delà de l’aide alimentaire, les Restos du Cœur ont très vite étendu leurs actions à l’aide à la personne et à l’insertion. Car pour sortir durablement de l’exclusion, un repas ne suffit pas. Il faut aussi résoudre toutes les difficultés (retrouver un emploi, avoir un toit,…) pour une insertion durable.

La plus grande partie des ressources de l’association provient des dons et legs (46.1 % en 2012/201). S’y
ajoutent les produits des opérations Enfoirés (12.3 % en 2012/2013) et les subventions des collectivités publiques (en 2012/2013, 17.4% pour les organismes nationaux, 11.7 % de produits en provenance de l’Union Européenne et 9.1% de produits divers et financiers).

Les Restos du Cœur sont très soucieux d’utiliser au mieux ces fonds publics et privés : les frais généraux sont réduits (7% en 2012-2013) et les dépenses superflues éliminées. En conséquence, plus de 93 % des ressources sont consacrés aux actions de l’association.

L’activité de l’association ne s’exerce que sur le territoire français métropolitain. Il n’existe aucune association agréée en dehors de l’Hexagone, car cela nécessiterait des structures de gestion beaucoup plus lourdes et donc plus onéreuses. Et, parce que les législations et les règles fiscales sont différentes, aucune association basée ou opérant à l’étranger ne relève de l’association française.



 

Le football c’est l’école de la vie… Albert Camus ⚽️🏃🏾

football ecole de la vie5 Groupement fle schools supported a competition organised by the French linguistic attaché in Spain, Manuela Ferrero Pinto. The French Ambassador, M Yves Saint-Geours in Spain was the guest of honour at the Institut Français de Madrid at the ceremony to give out the prizes to enthusiastic young learners of French.

The national competition, to celebrate the anniversary of French author Albert Camus’ Nobel Prize award, was organised by the Institut Français in Spain. Existential author Camus was 44 when he received the award and had been a first class footballer until tuberculosis cut short his sporting career.

Groupement fle schools Accent Français , CMAF, Cap d’ail, French in Normandy, Institut de Touraine and LSF all supported the initiative giving a week of French lessons to winning teams of 6 from various schools throughout Spain. 

Said Groupement fle spokesperson Eleri Maitland, who was present at the ceremony on behalf of GFLE, “Groupement fle is proud to partner the Institut Français in Spain. Our job is to encourage and support initiatives that put the French language centre stage. Naturally, as the number one network of French language schools in France, it is our role to work closely with French government institutions to encourage and promote the French language. We are delighted to have been instrumental in this fantastic and very successful project and we look forward to welcoming the winners to France this year“.


A Good Test of my French | Student Blog

Back to England and an unexpected French lesson for Alan


Bonne Année mes amis,

J’espère que tu as passe de bonnes vacances ?

I did, but not until after a little French adventure! It’s Friday 22nd December and after a few lunchtime celebrations and Joyeux Noels at the school, all the little elves were rushing home for Christmas. Including me who had left French in Normandy and taken a leisurely drive to Ouistreham, near Caen, to catch my overnight ferry back to England to see family and friends and astound them with my linguistic excellence over the Christmas period. I arrived at the port early, 4.45pm, chilled and ready to have a relaxing dinner before boarding at 10pm; but then disaster struck! I noticed a red battery light on my dashboard had come one; then while I am staring at it wondering if I can make it across to England to deal with it, the rest of the dashboard lit up like a Christmas tree; as pretty but not as welcome I can tell you. Then the engine stopped.

It’s now 5pm, the last Friday before Christmas, it’s raining heavily, my emergency breakdown insurance had lapsed, and I had not renewed it, silly boy. It is now that a little extra French language practice was going to begin. I noticed a gendarmerie van with three officers in it parked nearby. I walked over and politely ‘frappe la porte’ and in my best French asked if they could help me as my car had “…ma voiture est tombée en panne…”. They asked if I had insurance cover and gave a little gallic shrug when I said no. I took this to mean you’re on your own mate; so, I trudged back to the car wondering what to do. However, I did the French police a disservice as a few minutes
later they walked over to say in a mix of French and English that they had found and called a breakdown truck. I was very grateful and even broke open some Christmas chocolates to say thank you, which being good policeman they politely declined. Anyway, less than 30 minutes passed, and the breakdown truck arrived with a lovely man called Jacques to look after me. He spoke not one word of English, so off I went again, explaining the batterie est mort. He popped the bonnet and within 30 seconds had discovered the problem, le courroie de ventilateur est cassé. A broken fan belt to you and me. I was going nowhere tonight and nowhere for the next week in my car!

Donc…now I had to organise the car to be towed to the garage in Caen, for them to keep it safe until I returned and to organise the repair. In the meantime, I had to reserve a hotel for the evening, change my boat reservation, book a hire car for me to collect from Caen railway station, arrange to collect my suitcases from my car in the morning and arrange a taxi to collect me to take me to Hertz office in the morning. All of it in French! By the time I had sat down in the hotel restaurant that evening and hit the carafe du vin rouge that was essential if I was to remain sane, I felt exhausted but also a rather smug sense of satisfaction at what I had achieved. I guarantee I would not have been able to have organised all of this in French just six weeks before. To complete the tale, off I went in my little Peugeot rental car for two weeks and I had a lovely Christmas with family and friends. I had to, of course, alter my return crossing on the telephone from England because I needed to arrive on the Saturday to collect my car and return the hire car (another successful conversation). By the time I arrived back and returned the hire car and picked my repaired vehicle up, I was speaking like a native. Well, not really, but certainly my confidence was high even if my French was pretty lousy.

At this point I’d like to tell my English friends that the rumours about French people not talking to you unless your French is perfect is utter rubbish. Every person I met could not have done more to help me. They spoke slowly, they repeated words and sentences, so I could understand, and they even chipped in with the odd phrase in English. I even had a conversation with the hotel patron about it and he said the problem is “you Eengleesh, you ask me if I parler anglais and if I say a leetle, you begin talking to me as if I am fluent…”. I think us Brits need to try harder.

Anyway, that was that. A very handy little exercise in French and a large reminder to renew one’s breakdown cover on one’s car. I dare not tell you how much it all cost me!!

So, its January 8th, first day back at school and this week we are under the watchful eye of the senior Professeur, Olivier. I was a little apprehensive this morning I must admit. The morning period was spent huddled in a circle having a little conversation about names and introductions and where we lived. Basically, a little refresher and my goodness it was needed by all of us. Lots of blank looks and painful frowns as we struggled to recall vocabulary and grammar but by break time it was gradually seeping back into our befuddled brains. By close of day today we were back on the ball and learning new stuff. Prof Olivier’s bad-boy reputation is unjustified as he turned out to be as much fun and laughter as the rest of his colleagues, and he wears a natty line in checked trousers as well!

I’ll keep you posted.

Alan


 

Even the grammaire is fun | Student blog

December recap from our friend Alan


Well as you can tell by the date my blog kind of got forgotten, I’m sorry but it has been a little busy. In the last 3 weeks we have had 3 different teachers – Christine of course, Diane and Selma. Each one of these great teachers brought a different complexion to the lessons. It provides great variety and keeps you on your toes. As for subject matter – phew – we have done everything!

We have discussed daily what each of us has been getting up to in the evenings after school or at the week-ends ……Qu’est-ce que tu fait hier soir? Week-end?…..the answers as you may imagine have been hilarious as we each try and explain the bewildering variety of activities in our less than perfect French and with a severely limited vocabulary. I mean what is the French word for chasing after runaway dogs; cooking Korean noodles in your bedsit, or getting lost in the back streets of Rouen?

Once the mornings hilarity subsides we get down to the serious business of learning, you know things like grammaire, dictée, et écrive. In actual fact, even the grammaire is fun although it still pushes ones little grey cells.

We are put into situations using all kinds of media – the internet, Youtube videos and photographs and have to use the lessons of grammar, the new vocabulary, reading, listening and writing to either describe what we are seeing or conduct a little role play. We have each described and presented about our hometowns – describing a haunted house tour in Stratford upon Avon was very funny.

We have all travelled to Paris by train and organised the return journey, even discussing first or second class; we have visited all kinds of shops and discussed minor and major ailments at the doctors – the use of a bad head from over imbibing seemed to be used and remembered a lot!

We have covered a little French and world geography which is interesting as where Canada is depends very much upon where you come from in the first place – from France it is definitely in the l’oest but if you come from Japan its definitely from l’est! The aural difference between the two is miniscule. (On the subject of miniscule, did you know majuscule was french for a capital letter?) I now have a working knowledge of Carcassonne which a very historic town in the south east of France. So much of this geography is useful and role playing being in a tourist office is extremely useful. Regrettably we have not actually visited these places but we have done other things.

One evening we made la carte noel – complete with glitter and glue. We all, yes including me, got roped in to some kind of cabaret dance routine whilst working in the technology room – I still don’t know what that was all about? We learnt each others ‘surnom’ which to my English speaking friends is not the family name when in France but is in fact your nickname. Meg, Essissimo, Arri’ Professeur D’amour and Shep have all been used extensively since.

We said a fond and a sad farewell to Dayze and Arrianne from Sao Paolo, Megumi from Tokyo, Elly from Bonn and Patrick from Gieswil. We shall miss them next week, its strange how quickly you become friends in the face of collective adversity!

Finally to close this week we had a dégustation d’huîtres – oyster tasting – hosted by the ever effervescent Vanessa , Cri-cri (nickname of Christine) and supervised by mini-Christine her beautiful little girl. A great couple of weeks and oddly I do seem to be improving. I have been to the post office, the boulangerie, the supermarche and a restaurant and held successful conversations in each without having to revert to ‘Je suis desolé, je suis Anglais’ at all.

More to follow, keep reading. A bientot mes amis!

Alan


You are learning because you want to learn | Student Blog

Let’s see how Alan is getting on at French in Normandy with this latest update…


Well its getting a little tougher now! We have begun to look at ‘au present simple’ and ‘passe compose’ – in other words present and past tense! When they start discussing ‘conjugasion’ and reflexive verbs, I struggle. I never learnt this in English let alone in French! However, I’m not feeling too bad about it as although it is taking some concentration it is beginning to register slowly in my very small and very old brain!

The other interesting change is the way that within only two weeks this small international fraternity of students begin to mould into small friendships. Mind you, every now and then someone new appears – a new starter, and someone disappears – either finished and off home, or worse for one’s self-esteem they have been moved to a different group, presumably because they are too good for us beginners. At first, you feel a little piqued and then as Eleri, our seat of all wisdom, remarked “Well, how long did it take you to learn your first language?”. You then realise it’s not a competition here. You are learning because you want to learn, and you learn at whatever pace is right for you. It relaxes you when you accept this.

Every morning there is a little congregation outside the entrance to the school that greet each other warmly with little smiles of embarrassment in their new-found French. Each day there are new phrases added to the vocabulary that we all try out on each other, and if you happen to say something not quite correct to someone who is a couple of groups ahead of you, they gently smile and educate you in the correct way – regardless of age by the way, the other day a 17-year-old Japanese girl corrected my pronunciation, thank you Mina! Its all done with the best intentions and a far cry from the bullying aggressive attitude of my inner-city school gate; oh so, so, so long ago!

Beautiful Normandy Countryside

It’s quite sweet and makes you feel part of one big, probably slightly, dysfunctional family.

As for life ‘en France’, is it becoming easier and more familiar? Peut-être (perhaps). I visited Fontainebleau, south-west of Paris last week-end. It’s worth a visit for the palace alone. Anyway, I was quite confident as I checked in to my hotel, announcing in a strong voice in French that they should have a reservation for me? Trouble is, one should also remember that the quicker and more confident one sounds the quicker and more complex they respond. C’est une problem. This left me feeling a little awkward and embarrassed as I had to ask them to repeat their question ‘lentements, s’il vous plait!’. They then glance slightly despairingly at the heavens and respond with near perfect English, which of course does not help me improve my French one little bit. I have to say, in a mild defence of the majority of my countrymen, it is quite difficult to learn a foreign language when you are British because a) which one do you choose? And b) everyone by now speaks near perfect English and cannot be bothered to help educate us. I don’t blame them, but it does sometimes get a little frustrating, but then the whole of the French nation is not here to teach me French. Damn my arrogance!

So another week over. I’ll keep you posted on progress.

Alan


 

french summer camp

French for Juniors in Andorra | HES Idiomas & French in Normandy

An exciting new “French for Juniors” course in Andorra


french for juniorsFrom July 2018 HES IdiomasRialp Camp, Andorra,  will be offering French language courses as well as Spanish and English for Juniors.

« This is an exciting new departure for us » said HES Idiomas CEO, Ferran Casas. « We had been thinking about teaching French, because it is such an important language and one that is so essential on the international stage. With the arrival of Macron and the increased popularity of the French language, we thought that 2018 was a great year to launch this project

Prior to this new addition, HES IdiomasRialp Camp had offered language courses in English and Spanish for Juniors aged 6-17 in Andorra, France’s neighbour. French is used widely day to day in Andorra, where education in French and French Culture are heldin high esteem.  « Working in Andorra, it seemed only natural to add French as an option, but we wanted to offer the best possible French language courses and so looked around for an expert who would be interested in joining us. I am pleased to announce that French in Normandy, our first choice as a partner for this project, is now on board » continued Casas.

 Ferran Casas and Eleri Maitland met in Malaga thanks to the ALPHE conference there and have put together this exciting new offer « French in Andorra ». 

Eleri took up the story : « Our junior programme was very small and in homestay. We could not find suitable residential accommodation in line with current safeguarding legislation in Normandy, so the whole programme was in question when suddenly, Ferran came up with this idea and it is just great » she said with a smile . « What we love is the first rate 4-star quality residential accommodation in a secure location, which corresponds to what our clients are looking for in a programme for their Junior learners and the breadth of the activity programme which is guaranteed to delight any youngster, even the most recalcitrant teenager.»

Rialp Camp Andorra offers language courses in the morning, and then a choice of 15 activities such as pony trekking, football, basketball , rafting, karting etc. plus a full and diverse evening social programme to cater for all tastes. Students can either choose one activity for a whole week or opt for a programme with a different activity daily. The level of qualified supervision, accommodation and catering has made Rialp one of the most popular Junior Campuses on offer.

HES Idiomas Rialp Camp Andorra is open from July 2 to July 27, 2018 and full details about the language courses or language and activity programme can be obtained from either Ferran Casas : [email protected] /www.hescamps.com or Eleri Maitland: [email protected]frenchinnormandy.com