French in Normandy Supports Professional Development

Dialoge is an IALC sister school of French in Normandy. Based in Germany, at the beautiful Lake of Constance, it offers a range of German classes at all levels. Dialoge has 14 Erasmus+ mobility courses, providing professional development opportunities for teachers and administration from around Europe. French in Normandy supports the continuous training and professional development of its staff and teachers and Christian Gaujac has been the first to participate in this programme, choosing Dialoge for 1 week of intensive German course in Lindau. As you can see from the photos, Christian enjoyed and benefited from a week of training and professional exchange.

French in Normandy also provides a variety of Erasmus+ courses for teachers and staff who want to either improve their French language skills or refine their teaching techniques.

Christian and Christina Rüger in charge of marketing and sales at Dialoge

french language france

Update from French in Normandy Management

French in Normandy is taking measures and behaving responsibly in the face of the spreading Coronavirus.

At present and for the foreseeable future, we have no students coming from countries where the virus is causing the most infection but this may change. Any student enrolling from these countries (currently China, Hong Kong, Macao, de Singapore, South Korea and also north of Italy namely Lombardy and Venice) will be asked to follow French government health guidelines and stay at home for two weeks before integrating at French in Normandy. The list of countries is being monitored to ensure that this policy is up to date and in line with French Health authority recommendations.

We are reminding our host families, staff and students of basic hygiene requirements in order to combat contagion (regular hand washing and using tissues once only) and have placed extra hand disinfectants in all classrooms as well as tissues to ensure that these basic procedures are followed.

To minimise the risk of illness among students, staff and visitors we are actively encouraging and promoting good hand washing, cough and sneeze etiquette, and follow French Health authorities advice about keeping any specific individuals away.

French in Normandy is ensuring a clean environment.
It is important that we maintain a clean environment to prevent the spread of illness. All our facilities have good ventilation and regular cleaning practices. We are cleaning surfaces with a neutral detergent followed by a recommended disinfectant solution. Surfaces that are frequently touched with hands are being cleaned daily.

French in Normandy is making every effort ensure that there is a safe working environment for those students that are with us and for those will be arriving and we have made provision for support during their recovery in the unhappy event that we have students or staff affected.
These procedures will be updated on a daily basis

School Groups

For groups booked at French in Normandy that are unable to travel but who have paid a deposit or the full amount, we will hold the price and a credit until 31/12/2020 and suggest rescheduled dates.

2019 DELF DALF Pass Rates

French in Normandy is proud to be a leader in preparing students for the DELF and DALF French exams.


What exactly are the DELF and DALF exams, you ask? DELF and DALF are diplomas awarded by the French Ministry of Education to certify the level of French-language skills of non-French speakers. These diplomas are valid for life and recognised all around the world. To obtain them, you must take the DELF and DALF examinations, which assess your communication skills in real situations using authentic documents.

Students from around the world trust French in Normandy to help them achieve their French language learning goals. French in Normandy is accredited by several top international organizations including the International Association of Language Centres, International House and Qualité FLE ensuring the highest quality courses, teachers and services.

Your success is our success and we are pleased to share with you our 2019 pass rates for the DELF and DALF exams. These numbers are a reflection of the hard work of both our students and teachers as well as the quality of education that French in Normandy provides.

delf dalf exam pass rates


Do you have questions about the DELF and DALF exam preparation programs at French in Normandy? Feel free to contact us or read more about DELF and DALF exam preparation on our website.

What is the difference between DELF and DALF?

DELF Certificate: 8 Effective Preparation Techniques

Top Tips To Prepare For Your French DELF A1 Exam

All about DELF Exam Preparation

All about DALF Exam Preparation

how to teach a foreign language

Essential tips for teaching a foreign language effectively

How to teach a foreign language effectively: 4 essential tips


What’s your preferred teaching method when it comes to languages? What can you do to make lessons more engaging and productive for your students? 

Let’s face it, being a language teacher is highly rewarding. Not only do you get to travel and further your passion for a language and its culture, but as a language teacher, you can also give these special gifts to your students.  

You might say that being any kind of teacher has similar benefits. However, there’s something especially remarkable about imparting language. In doing so, you open up perspectives and broaden horizons so your students can travel the world, explore different cultures and open dialogues with people from completely different backgrounds. For your students, it can turn into a lifelong passion, a career, or a relationship. 

So what are the fundamental pillars of language teaching? How can you improve your teaching so your students develop their language skills better?

Here at French in Normandy you can take a range of different French teacher training courses – find more information here or contact us for more information. 

Read on for our essential tips for effective language teaching. 

how to teach a foreign language


Tip 1. Learn about different approaches, methodologies and techniques

Do you tend to teach French by focusing on grammar and vocabulary acquisition? Do you place an emphasis on spoken communication? Or do you provide task-based learning exercises? 

One size doesn’t fit all and over the years our understanding of language education has evolved. Being a teacher is a continual learning journey – there are always new things to discover and put into practice in classroom situations. 

For instance, here at the French in Normandy school, we offer courses that cover different methods. Some of the most popular ones include: 

Approche neurolinguistique (ANL) – The Neurolinguistic Approach 

The Neurolinguistic Approach has been developed based on an understanding of the parts of the brain associated with language acquisition. You can read more about it here

You can see what this teacher had to say about it: 

Technologies de l’information et de la communication à l’école (TICE) – Using new technology in the classroom 

This method incorporates the use of new technology in teaching. The classrooms here at French in Normandy are almost completely paper-free these days, and teachers can learn how to introduce different kinds of technology into their lessons effectively with this course. 

Discipline Non Linguistique (DNL) – Non-linguistic discipline

As well as providing exposure to the language, teaching another specialist subject through language provides a specific focus for language learning that can be very effective.  

Tip 2: Go beyond textbooks and embrace modern media

Almost anyone learning a language today spends a significant amount of their time looking at screens – especially the screens of their smartphones – and using apps. Making use of this and other new technology to aid language teaching means your students can use media they’re familiar with and increase their immersion in the language in different contexts. 

This can take many forms. It could mean posting, sharing and encouraging conversations in the language on social media platforms, or using their favourite boxsets as the basis of an exercise. It could also mean using tools like quiz and competition apps to ‘gamify’ learning and further motivate your students. 

Tip 3: Find a variety of ways for students to immerse themselves in the language

We can all agree that immersion in the target language is essential for language learning. However, this doesn’t have to mean a conversation with a native speaker. While opportunities to have those conversations should be available to students on as regular a basis as possible, why not encourage your students to immerse themselves in other ways that match their interests? 

While literature can work for some, others prefer music and listening to lyrics, others films and boxsets, and others may prefer to learn vocabulary while cooking. Help your students use their hobbies to maximise their exposure to the language outside the classroom.  

Tip 4: Create a safe and positive learning environment

Having the confidence to make mistakes – and the opportunity to discuss and learn from them – is absolutely key to language learning. 

How you structure your lessons and how you provide feedback has an enormous impact on your students’ sense of security, and whatever your preferred methods are, if your students are to improve, they need a space that’s free from judgment and safe enough to make any mistakes, knowing they’ll be seen only as an opportunity to improve.  

Explore our resources and improve your language teaching

We all remember good teachers of any subjects, but language teachers are perhaps on another level. Through language learning, you gain the satisfaction of mastering grammar and the ability to recall the
right word or phrase for a given situation. But you also open the door to new culture – through film, literature, etc. – and new relationships too. 

The buzz and increased confidence you feel when you can speak a language fluently with a native
speaker is hard to beat. Whether it’s the teachers who help you unleash the joy of uncoding and discovering books by great authors in their original language or the ones who help you make sense of
using the subjunctive, the language teachers who really help you stay with you for life. 

While every teacher brings something of themselves and their own experience to teaching, these tips can hopefully help you provide an even higher quality learning experience for your students. 

If you’d like to explore the subject in more detail and read other articles on teaching foreign languages, you can browse all our related articles. 

Our French teacher training courses are designed for teachers from around the world as well as for teachers in Europe who wish to take part in either a French language programme or a methodology programme via the Erasmus grant.

In addition to the different methodologies, all our courses help teachers develop skills and confidence in a number of essential areas, including how to motivate students and keep their attention, how to establish a class dynamic and make the most of interactions in the classroom, and how to respond to specific learning needs within groups. 

If you’re looking to develop your teaching skills and would like to find out more about the teacher training courses on offer here in Rouen, Normandy, you can get more information here.  

 

study French in France

Where to study French in France: choose from the top destinations to improve your French.

Deciding where to study French in France is difficult – because there is so much choice!

France is a big, beautiful country which can offer almost everything you might want. There are busy Mediterranean resorts with warm seas, or Atlantic Western coasts perfect for body-boarding. There are fields filled with sunflowers in summer, or vegetables and wheat further north. France is dotted with tiny villages and country towns, and every region has at least one city with its own character, local food and culture. And lots of those offer French courses.

The best way to learn French in France is to make the most of this and become part of the community wherever you study. So how will you make the choice?

study French in France

Where to study French in France: think about you

What kind of person are you? What kind of student are you? Where do you feel happy?

You might be the kind of person who will enjoy any of the top destinations to improve your French. Or you might be the kind of person who is only really happy in certain surroundings. 

So start by asking yourself some questions. Be honest with yourself – this is an important decision!

  • Do I like living in a big city or would I prefer somewhere quieter?
  • Why do I want to study French in France? Do I want to prepare for French examinations, improve my language skills for my career, be able to study in a French university or specialist school? Or am I motivated by personal development or to experience living in a different country? 
  • Would I prefer to study in a small school or a large one?
  • Do I want to party a lot, or do I prefer to have some quieter time as well as socialising?
  • How much French culture do I want to enjoy? What type of culture do I most want to experience? Food? Museums? Historic buildings? Music, theatre and cinema? 
  • Do I want to be somewhere where I can walk in the countryside or visit the beach? 
  • Do I want to live in a residence or with a French host family?
  • What’s my budget? Do I need to think about cities that offer better value for money?
  • Do I want to travel around France or more widely in Europe while I’m studying? 

Your answers to all of these questions will help you choose where to study French in France.

What are the top destinations in France to study French?

So, you’ve got more of an idea about what surroundings you need to study French in France and pass your French examinations! The next thing is to think about the top destinations to improve your French.

Before you do this, remember that Paris is by far the biggest city in France. Depending on how you measure the population, it has approximately 10 million residents. The next biggest is Lyon, with around 1.5 million residents. Here in Rouen, we have about 450,000 residents in the city centre, and we think we’re a perfect size for everything!

Let’s look at some of the top destinations to improve your French

Paris Think about France and you think about the Eiffel Tower, Notre Dame and Montmartre. Paris is a city for lovers, for intellectuals, for tourists and for people in a hurry. But it may also be the toughest place in France for you to improve your French, as you’re more likely to find people who speak your own language to you. It’s also not going to be the most cost-effective option.

Everyone should visit Paris and practice their French there. But for most people who want to learn French in France, the best option might be to find a destination to improve your French where you can visit Paris without too much difficulty.

Lyon is France’s third-largest city, south of Paris and not far from the Swiss border. There are plenty of students here because of the university and it’s relaxed and friendly. It is a UNESCO World Heritage site. 

Nice is on the Mediterranean coast close to the Italian border and one of the most-visited cities in France, getting around four million tourists through the airport each year.

where to study french in france

Marseille is the largest city on the Mediterranean coast and France’s busiest port – it’s also France’s third-largest city in area.

Montpellier is just inland of the Mediterranean in the south of France. Around a third of the population are students from the three universities and other higher education institutions. 

Biarritz became famous as a spa destination and then one of Europe’s premier tourist resorts in the 19th and 20th centuries. Biarritz is on the Atlantic coast and became the first surfing resort in Europe, and is close to the border with Spain. 

where to study french in france

Toulouse is called The Pink City because of the bricks used to build many of its buildings. It is France’s fourth-biggest city, and the university has the country’s fourth-largest university campus. It is the centre of the European aerospace industry and has two UNESCO World Heritage sites.

Rouen is obviously our favourite place to study French in France – because that’s where French in Normandy, our school, is based!

Why do we think Rouen is a good place to study? Here are a few reasons:

  • Perfect size (around half a million people) so it’s small and friendly with lots of French speakers to talk to
  • Amazing architecture and history – there’s the Cathedral, a 14th-century clock and the castle as well as lots of museums and a colourful history
  • Food! Rouen is in Normandy which has some of France’s best cheeses and regional dishes
  • Great transport links to the rest of France and Europe. Rouen is just 1.5 hours from the centre of Paris
  • French in Normandy – our school has years of expertise in helping students study French in France and pass French examinations.


So how will you choose where to study French?

It’s a great choice to make – but only you can make it.

There are some great French courses in France and lots of top destinations to improve your French. 

Remember, that the best French courses for you might not be the best for everyone. If you want to succeed, and perhaps pass French examinations, you need to think about what kind of place will suit you best.

It’s important to consider what kind of place will be best for you, what your budget is – and what the school is like.

Do you need more help to decide where to study French?

We’re happy to help. We offer French preparation courses for DELF and DALF and TCF/TEF, or can simply help you improve your language skills.

Contact us if you’d like any more information about what we offer and how we can meet your needs, whether you want help to decide on the best place for you to study French in France, more information about your French level, or the most useful French examination for you.


Photo credits
Rouen
Biarritz