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online french courses

What’s the best way to learn French online?

Promotion June – September 2020

French in Normandy is reopening after several challenging months of closure during the COVID-19 pandemic. We’ve missed our students and we look forward to welcoming you back to our award-winning school in the heart of Normandy. 

Students starting their course between July 13 – September 30 will receive 3 weeks + 1 week FREE when registering for a General Intensive French course (25 hours / week). School fees must be paid minimum 4 weeks before the start of the course.

Get a quote for your course and register online now.

Be sure to read our new health & safety regulations and temporary cancellation policy.

À bientôt à Rouen!

Health & Safety Regulations & Cancellation Policies

As we reopen the school and look towards the future, French in Normandy has devised comprehensive  guidelines to ensure the health & safety of our staff and students. All students will be provided with a set of expectations to follow both in the school and at their accommodation. The cooperation of all students, visitors, teachers and staff is imperative to continued success at French in Normandy, allowing everyone to achieve their French learning goals in this new setting. The new health & safety guidelines are outlined below followed by temporary cancellation and refund policies.



STUDENTS 

Everyone entering the school MUST immediately sanitise their hands and each class room will be equipped with sanitiser for regular use and tissues for single use.

Students must all be in the school at the time given and may only enter up to 30 minutes after their class starts as classes may have to be given at staggered intervals.

Students are responsible for their own personal equipment which must not be shared and must be kept clean and sanitised daily.

Students must come to French in Normandy equipped with their own face protection – we suggest a visor as this will facilitate language learning and a mask which is necessary for all public transport and in designated public places.

Students agree to stick to the designated pathways in the school, respect staggered coffee breaks, not congregate in groups of more than 10.

Students are responsible for their health and safety, that of other students and that of our staff in respecting the 1 metre social distancing rule at all times.

Students will receive an eco friendly mug on arrival and they will be responsible for using/keeping clean. Mugs must be named and not be shared with anyone else.

Students who decide to eat in the premises must provide their own utensils and take them away. Anything found in the staff kitchen or anywhere else in the school, will be removed at the end of the day. 

For both staff and students, smoking or using electronic cigarettes, is NOT permitted in or near the school to avoid groupings. 

Anyone breaking these rules will not be allowed entrance to the school and no refunds will be given. 


STAFF

All staff entering the school MUST immediately disinfect their hands. Each class room will be equipped with hand sanitisers for regular use and tissues for single use.

Teaching staff must all be in the school at least 30 minutes before their class starts as classes may have to be given at staggered intervals.

All staff must wear a mask on public transport to and from the school and wear a face protection visor in the school and in lessons.

Teaching staff will be responsible for keeping windows open and airing the classrooms (shutters may be closed if windy, wet etc) and closing them after the lessons.

All staff are responsible for their own personal equipment which must not be shared and must be disinfected twice daily.

Teaching staff will be responsible for disinfecting the equipment they use in class (ie Bluetooth keyboards/tv commands etc).

All staff are responsible for ensuring that students stick to the designated pathways, ensuring that staggered coffee breaks are respected and that students do not congregate in groups of more than 10.

All staff are responsible for themselves and their students in respecting the 1 metre social distancing rule at all times.

All staff are responsible for tidying up and removing the waste paper bin liner from their class or post and placing it in the outside containers daily. 

All staff will receive an eco-friendly mug on arrival and they will be responsible for using/keeping clean. Mugs must not be shared with anyone else 

Staff who decide to eat in the premises must provide their own utensils and take them away. Anything found in the staff kitchen or anywhere else in the school, will be removed at the end of the day. 


Temporary Cancellation & Refund Policy

1. FIN/Host families/commercial accommodation can not be held responsible in case of illness. Students agree to abide by all hygiene rules and safety regulations laid down by the French government, the school and the school’s recognised accommodation options. Health & safety recommendations are subject to change as the pandemic evolves. Some of these conditions include:

a. maintaining physical/social distance of minimum 1 meter, refraining from personal contact with other students, staff and teachers (no handshakes, no kissing or hugging)

b. regular, proper hand washing and sanitising

c. limiting gatherings in any setting inside and outside the school

d. proper disinfecting/washing of personal equipment (i.e. reusable masks and visors)

e. no sharing of personal items (i.e. masks, pens, phones/tablets, cutlery etc)

f. Students MUST inform the reception or emergency number staff at once in case of ANY sign of fever/infection. FIN instructions must then be followed.

g. In the event of a new government imposed lockdown, French in Normandy will provide students with the option to complete their course online or receive a voucher for any unused courses to be taken at a later date.

h. Courses may be cancelled up to 5 business days before the start date with no cancellation fees. Cancellation must be received by the agent or student in writing to the school’s main email address at info (@) frenchinnormandy.com.

3. Students must arrive at French in Normandy at the time given to them and must disinfect their hands upon arrival at the school. Students agree to arrive with a clean mask and transparent face visor and any other equipment they wish to use (phones/tablettes/laptops etc) for which they are responsible and will agree to sanitise and disinfect daily.

4. Students booking a host family accommodation must realise that social distancing may not be possible at all times within the family environment.

5. In the case of quarantine being required by the French authorities students will have to isolate themselves at their own expense.


Contact us in case of any questions regarding these policies and regulations.

Download the registration form to book a French language course.

french language france

Update from French in Normandy Management

French in Normandy is taking measures and behaving responsibly in the face of the spreading Coronavirus.

At present and for the foreseeable future, we have no students coming from countries where the virus is causing the most infection but this may change. Any student enrolling from these countries (currently China, Hong Kong, Macao, de Singapore, South Korea and also north of Italy namely Lombardy and Venice) will be asked to follow French government health guidelines and stay at home for two weeks before integrating at French in Normandy. The list of countries is being monitored to ensure that this policy is up to date and in line with French Health authority recommendations.

We are reminding our host families, staff and students of basic hygiene requirements in order to combat contagion (regular hand washing and using tissues once only) and have placed extra hand disinfectants in all classrooms as well as tissues to ensure that these basic procedures are followed.

To minimise the risk of illness among students, staff and visitors we are actively encouraging and promoting good hand washing, cough and sneeze etiquette, and follow French Health authorities advice about keeping any specific individuals away.

French in Normandy is ensuring a clean environment.
It is important that we maintain a clean environment to prevent the spread of illness. All our facilities have good ventilation and regular cleaning practices. We are cleaning surfaces with a neutral detergent followed by a recommended disinfectant solution. Surfaces that are frequently touched with hands are being cleaned daily.

French in Normandy is making every effort ensure that there is a safe working environment for those students that are with us and for those will be arriving and we have made provision for support during their recovery in the unhappy event that we have students or staff affected.
These procedures will be updated on a daily basis

School Groups

For groups booked at French in Normandy that are unable to travel but who have paid a deposit or the full amount, we will hold the price and a credit until 31/12/2020 and suggest rescheduled dates.

how to teach a foreign language

Essential tips for teaching a foreign language effectively

How to teach a foreign language effectively: 4 essential tips


What’s your preferred teaching method when it comes to languages? What can you do to make lessons more engaging and productive for your students? 

Let’s face it, being a language teacher is highly rewarding. Not only do you get to travel and further your passion for a language and its culture, but as a language teacher, you can also give these special gifts to your students.  

You might say that being any kind of teacher has similar benefits. However, there’s something especially remarkable about imparting language. In doing so, you open up perspectives and broaden horizons so your students can travel the world, explore different cultures and open dialogues with people from completely different backgrounds. For your students, it can turn into a lifelong passion, a career, or a relationship. 

So what are the fundamental pillars of language teaching? How can you improve your teaching so your students develop their language skills better?

Here at French in Normandy you can take a range of different French teacher training courses – find more information here or contact us for more information. 

Read on for our essential tips for effective language teaching. 

how to teach a foreign language


Tip 1. Learn about different approaches, methodologies and techniques

Do you tend to teach French by focusing on grammar and vocabulary acquisition? Do you place an emphasis on spoken communication? Or do you provide task-based learning exercises? 

One size doesn’t fit all and over the years our understanding of language education has evolved. Being a teacher is a continual learning journey – there are always new things to discover and put into practice in classroom situations. 

For instance, here at the French in Normandy school, we offer courses that cover different methods. Some of the most popular ones include: 

Approche neurolinguistique (ANL) – The Neurolinguistic Approach 

The Neurolinguistic Approach has been developed based on an understanding of the parts of the brain associated with language acquisition. You can read more about it here

You can see what this teacher had to say about it: 

Technologies de l’information et de la communication à l’école (TICE) – Using new technology in the classroom 

This method incorporates the use of new technology in teaching. The classrooms here at French in Normandy are almost completely paper-free these days, and teachers can learn how to introduce different kinds of technology into their lessons effectively with this course. 

Discipline Non Linguistique (DNL) – Non-linguistic discipline

As well as providing exposure to the language, teaching another specialist subject through language provides a specific focus for language learning that can be very effective.  

Tip 2: Go beyond textbooks and embrace modern media

Almost anyone learning a language today spends a significant amount of their time looking at screens – especially the screens of their smartphones – and using apps. Making use of this and other new technology to aid language teaching means your students can use media they’re familiar with and increase their immersion in the language in different contexts. 

This can take many forms. It could mean posting, sharing and encouraging conversations in the language on social media platforms, or using their favourite boxsets as the basis of an exercise. It could also mean using tools like quiz and competition apps to ‘gamify’ learning and further motivate your students. 

Tip 3: Find a variety of ways for students to immerse themselves in the language

We can all agree that immersion in the target language is essential for language learning. However, this doesn’t have to mean a conversation with a native speaker. While opportunities to have those conversations should be available to students on as regular a basis as possible, why not encourage your students to immerse themselves in other ways that match their interests? 

While literature can work for some, others prefer music and listening to lyrics, others films and boxsets, and others may prefer to learn vocabulary while cooking. Help your students use their hobbies to maximise their exposure to the language outside the classroom.  

Tip 4: Create a safe and positive learning environment

Having the confidence to make mistakes – and the opportunity to discuss and learn from them – is absolutely key to language learning. 

How you structure your lessons and how you provide feedback has an enormous impact on your students’ sense of security, and whatever your preferred methods are, if your students are to improve, they need a space that’s free from judgment and safe enough to make any mistakes, knowing they’ll be seen only as an opportunity to improve.  

Explore our resources and improve your language teaching

We all remember good teachers of any subjects, but language teachers are perhaps on another level. Through language learning, you gain the satisfaction of mastering grammar and the ability to recall the
right word or phrase for a given situation. But you also open the door to new culture – through film, literature, etc. – and new relationships too. 

The buzz and increased confidence you feel when you can speak a language fluently with a native
speaker is hard to beat. Whether it’s the teachers who help you unleash the joy of uncoding and discovering books by great authors in their original language or the ones who help you make sense of
using the subjunctive, the language teachers who really help you stay with you for life. 

While every teacher brings something of themselves and their own experience to teaching, these tips can hopefully help you provide an even higher quality learning experience for your students. 

If you’d like to explore the subject in more detail and read other articles on teaching foreign languages, you can browse all our related articles. 

Our French teacher training courses are designed for teachers from around the world as well as for teachers in Europe who wish to take part in either a French language programme or a methodology programme via the Erasmus grant.

In addition to the different methodologies, all our courses help teachers develop skills and confidence in a number of essential areas, including how to motivate students and keep their attention, how to establish a class dynamic and make the most of interactions in the classroom, and how to respond to specific learning needs within groups. 

If you’re looking to develop your teaching skills and would like to find out more about the teacher training courses on offer here in Rouen, Normandy, you can get more information here.  

 

study French in France

Where to study French in France: choose from the top destinations to improve your French.

Deciding where to study French in France is difficult – because there is so much choice!

France is a big, beautiful country which can offer almost everything you might want. There are busy Mediterranean resorts with warm seas, or Atlantic Western coasts perfect for body-boarding. There are fields filled with sunflowers in summer, or vegetables and wheat further north. France is dotted with tiny villages and country towns, and every region has at least one city with its own character, local food and culture. And lots of those offer French courses.

The best way to learn French in France is to make the most of this and become part of the community wherever you study. So how will you make the choice?

study French in France

Where to study French in France: think about you

What kind of person are you? What kind of student are you? Where do you feel happy?

You might be the kind of person who will enjoy any of the top destinations to improve your French. Or you might be the kind of person who is only really happy in certain surroundings. 

So start by asking yourself some questions. Be honest with yourself – this is an important decision!

  • Do I like living in a big city or would I prefer somewhere quieter?
  • Why do I want to study French in France? Do I want to prepare for French examinations, improve my language skills for my career, be able to study in a French university or specialist school? Or am I motivated by personal development or to experience living in a different country? 
  • Would I prefer to study in a small school or a large one?
  • Do I want to party a lot, or do I prefer to have some quieter time as well as socialising?
  • How much French culture do I want to enjoy? What type of culture do I most want to experience? Food? Museums? Historic buildings? Music, theatre and cinema? 
  • Do I want to be somewhere where I can walk in the countryside or visit the beach? 
  • Do I want to live in a residence or with a French host family?
  • What’s my budget? Do I need to think about cities that offer better value for money?
  • Do I want to travel around France or more widely in Europe while I’m studying? 

Your answers to all of these questions will help you choose where to study French in France.

What are the top destinations in France to study French?

So, you’ve got more of an idea about what surroundings you need to study French in France and pass your French examinations! The next thing is to think about the top destinations to improve your French.

Before you do this, remember that Paris is by far the biggest city in France. Depending on how you measure the population, it has approximately 10 million residents. The next biggest is Lyon, with around 1.5 million residents. Here in Rouen, we have about 450,000 residents in the city centre, and we think we’re a perfect size for everything!

Let’s look at some of the top destinations to improve your French

Paris Think about France and you think about the Eiffel Tower, Notre Dame and Montmartre. Paris is a city for lovers, for intellectuals, for tourists and for people in a hurry. But it may also be the toughest place in France for you to improve your French, as you’re more likely to find people who speak your own language to you. It’s also not going to be the most cost-effective option.

Everyone should visit Paris and practice their French there. But for most people who want to learn French in France, the best option might be to find a destination to improve your French where you can visit Paris without too much difficulty.

Lyon is France’s third-largest city, south of Paris and not far from the Swiss border. There are plenty of students here because of the university and it’s relaxed and friendly. It is a UNESCO World Heritage site. 

Nice is on the Mediterranean coast close to the Italian border and one of the most-visited cities in France, getting around four million tourists through the airport each year.

where to study french in france

Marseille is the largest city on the Mediterranean coast and France’s busiest port – it’s also France’s third-largest city in area.

Montpellier is just inland of the Mediterranean in the south of France. Around a third of the population are students from the three universities and other higher education institutions. 

Biarritz became famous as a spa destination and then one of Europe’s premier tourist resorts in the 19th and 20th centuries. Biarritz is on the Atlantic coast and became the first surfing resort in Europe, and is close to the border with Spain. 

where to study french in france

Toulouse is called The Pink City because of the bricks used to build many of its buildings. It is France’s fourth-biggest city, and the university has the country’s fourth-largest university campus. It is the centre of the European aerospace industry and has two UNESCO World Heritage sites.

Rouen is obviously our favourite place to study French in France – because that’s where French in Normandy, our school, is based!

Why do we think Rouen is a good place to study? Here are a few reasons:

  • Perfect size (around half a million people) so it’s small and friendly with lots of French speakers to talk to
  • Amazing architecture and history – there’s the Cathedral, a 14th-century clock and the castle as well as lots of museums and a colourful history
  • Food! Rouen is in Normandy which has some of France’s best cheeses and regional dishes
  • Great transport links to the rest of France and Europe. Rouen is just 1.5 hours from the centre of Paris
  • French in Normandy – our school has years of expertise in helping students study French in France and pass French examinations.


So how will you choose where to study French?

It’s a great choice to make – but only you can make it.

There are some great French courses in France and lots of top destinations to improve your French. 

Remember, that the best French courses for you might not be the best for everyone. If you want to succeed, and perhaps pass French examinations, you need to think about what kind of place will suit you best.

It’s important to consider what kind of place will be best for you, what your budget is – and what the school is like.

Do you need more help to decide where to study French?

We’re happy to help. We offer French preparation courses for DELF and DALF and TCF/TEF, or can simply help you improve your language skills.

Contact us if you’d like any more information about what we offer and how we can meet your needs, whether you want help to decide on the best place for you to study French in France, more information about your French level, or the most useful French examination for you.


Photo credits
Rouen
Biarritz

delf exams

DELF vs DALF: what is the difference?

French DELF A1 preparation

Top Tips To Prepare For Your French DELF A1 Exam

Getting a DELF French diploma can open the door to your ambitions. Many students need the DELF or DALF French diploma to get into university, perhaps in France or Switzerland, or to begin a career in the civil service. 

People who want to become professional bakers have found the DALF and DELF preparation course are very useful for taking the entrance exam to get a place at the INBP – the National Institute of Bakery and Pastry. 

And many students just want the qualification to show the level of French they’ve worked hard to achieve.

French DELF A1 preparation

Students of all nationalities want to take DALF preparation in France: at French in Normandy, we’ve taught people from many countries including Switzerland, Korea, and Latin America. 

If you want to pass French DELF A1, preparation is vital. As a beginners’ level qualification, A1 could be many students’ first experience of a DELF or DALF test. 

At French in Normandy, our language school in Rouen, we have lots of experience in supporting students in French DELF A1 preparation as well as other levels in the DELF and DALF tests. Not only can you learn with us at our school, but we can support you in the DELF or DALF online. 

What is the DELF French Diploma? And what are DALF French levels?

The DELF and DALF Diplomas match the six levels of the Council of Europe’ s Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL) from A1-C2. They are organised by the French Ministry of Education to certify the level of French-language skills of non-French speakers.

  • The DELF French Diploma (Diplôme d’études en langue française) is at levels A1-B2 of the Common European Framework, with an exam for each level. A1 and A2 are examined on Wednesdays and B1 and B2 on Thursdays. 
  • The DALF French Diploma  (Diplôme approfondi en langue française) is at C1and C2 levels of the Common European Framework, and is examined on Fridays.

French DELF A1 preparation: What to expect?

Like most language exams, DALF and DELF French diplomas will test you on the four skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. 

READING:

  • What’s in the French DELF A1 reading test? You’ll get four or five short texts about everyday situations and you’ll be asked to answer questions to check how well you’ve understood what you’ve read. It’s a good idea to read the texts once before looking at the questions.  Make sure you understand exactly what the questions are asking before reading the texts again.
  • How to prepare for the DELF A1 reading test The most useful thing you can do is read often. If you can find texts in French which are also translated into your own language, read the French and then check for meaning. Children’s books can be good, and so can websites. Try to be familiar with as many words as possible (and if you don’t understand any in the exam, try to work out what they mean from the rest of the text).

WRITING:

  • What’s in the French DELF A1 writing test? You’ll be asked to complete a form and write something short – like a postcard or email – about something people do in daily life. Be careful: make sure you write what you’ve been asked to write, and read it through carefully when you’ve done.
  • How to prepare for the DELF A1 writing test? Practise writing about things you do every day. Also the more you write out the same phrases again and again, the more you start to commit this to memory. Not only will you write more quickly, but you’ll also add it to the list of things you can say fluently without thinking about it.

LISTENING:

  • What’s in the French DELF A1 listening test? You will hear three or four short recordings about everyday situations twice, then answer questions on what you’ve heard. Remember, you DELF A1hear each recording twice. The first time, try to get the general idea of what you are hearing and on the second listening, be more aware of the details. This part of the test is checking for how well you’ve understood what you’ve heard and you don’t have to write in perfect French.
  • How can I prepare for the DELF A1 listening test? By listening to things! The radio is good, as is the TV, films and talking to people. The more you listen, the more you’ll hear the words and improve your understanding. Tell yourself that you won’t understand everything, and learn to relax about this. However by picking out just a few words from the TV, you’re tuning your brain in to the French language. Practice tests will also help you become more familiar with language at the DELF A1 level of French.

SPEAKING:

  • What’s in the French DELF A1 speaking test? There are three parts of this test:  guided conversation, exchanging information and role-play. In the first two parts be very careful to listen to what the examiner asks and make sure that’s what you answer. Remember you get ten minutes to prepare for the role play with the images you’ve been given so spend that time thinking about what you can say. 
  • How can I prepare for the DELF A1 speaking test? Speaking is vital: our school will help you. Our online course will check and correct your speaking exercises, and students in school will get plenty of practice talking inside and outside of class. When you’re revising vocabulary and phrases, remember to speak them out loud and not just in your head, so you give your mouth a chance to work on pronunciation too!

How can French in Normandy help you with French DELF A1 preparation?

We are very proud of our exam success rates: in 2017, 97 per cent of our students passed their exams. We can offer both DELF and DALF preparation courses at our school in beautiful Rouen, just an hour outside Paris, or online (although you will have to take the exam in France, and this option is only available for students at B2 and above).

Students on our DELF DALF preparation courses in France take General French in the morning as well as exam-specific sessions. Morning classes focus on the four skills, with exam tutorials in the afternoons. You’ll also get practice sessions with personalised correction and feedback. 

Some of our teachers are qualified, experienced DELF DALF examiners which help students to be confident and well prepared for their exam. Students can also attend free daily workshops after afternoon classes. 

Book your French DELF A1 preparation, or your DALF preparation course

We’re looking forward to meeting you at French in Normandy and helping you to get the qualifications you need with our DELF and DALF preparation in France. Find out more about our courses and book here

 

Study Science in France: French + Sciences Pathway

french sciencesFrench in Normandy is proud to have been chosen by Campus France as one of the participating schools in this new and exciting French and Science short course programme for students planning to study science in France.

French in Normandy provides full French language instruction while partner school ESIGELEC takes the lead role in the science elements of the programme along with CESI NORMANDIE and local companies. Together these three excellent Normandy institutions will receive students from around the world for this new three-week programme that offers first-class language training as well as a hands-on scientific experience for students planning to study science in France. Students will visit companies specialised in motor research, transport and energy solutions.

French + Sciences is designed for international English-speaking students in Sciences, who may be complete beginners in French: the scientific content is 100% taught in English.

Learn more about the programme in our brochure and contact us for details.

study science in France

5 things to teach your child when learning French as a second language

French is considered as a tough language to learn as well as pronounce. But it cannot be as hard as it seems to learn if you acquaint your child with the following things at preschool or at their early level of education.  As French is a global language, spoken in at least 29 countries and used by international organizations as an official language, learning French is important.

Before you enroll your child in a French-language school, provide him or her the basic knowledge that can make the French learning process easier. Have a look at the overview of the things that, if learned at an early stage, can aid the student to converse in French easily in the future. But before that, let us know why learning French is important?

why learning french is important

Learning skills: Why Learning French is important

Gradually like English, French has become an international language and to compete in today’s world or in the coming years, it is vital to be an expert in French. After English, it is at the second spot amongst the list of languages taught worldwide along with being 6th language of the world spoken across the globe. Various schools offer French classes and courses in France but French in Normandy is voted as the best French language school in France and offers courses for juniors, adults and seniors.

5 things to teach your child when learning French as a second language


Numbers and genders game

If you are planning to teach your child French at any stage after preschool, then make sure to verse him with the genders and numbers. In French, the pronouns and adjectives have to be in agreement, whereas similar is the case of the verb which is also supposed to agree. Make the child aware of grammar through various books through singing or poem recitation, etc. to prepare his foundation for French. 

Education of affirmative, negative, and interrogative statements

Learning French would be an easy job for your child by making him versed with the French translation of  words like what, where, when, why, who, and how which are referred as “quoi” , “où” , “qui” , “quand” , “Pourquoi” , “comment” in French respectively. This would help your child to learn the basics of French easily as with such words sentence formation becomes easy, which would be of immense assistance for students. A habit of noting down a word while reading a chapter is of immense help in learning, which could be a great aid in French too as it aids in increasing the vocabulary of French.  

Verbs

Acquaint your child about the changing form of verbs in French which varies from person to person, mood and tense, unlike English. These learned at a later stage in higher classes are hard to practice as students often forget them. Make such word practice in the daily life of your preschool toddler so that he can remember it for long. Make your toddler hear it while you read to keep it stored in his memory to enable him to learn French with great ease. Again, repeating these words, again and again, can help students to learn easily. 

Conditional and subjunctive

Perhaps you do not know about the verb forms or moods mentioned in French, but do you know that English too stores a similar pattern? The conditional sentences constitute ‘If’ in English whereas it is called “si” in French. Subjective is practiced at the time of uncertainty. Gradually make your child use subjunctives to make the French language, not a tough one to learn. Class discussion can act as a key to learning these.  

Pronunciation

French is difficult to pronounce and understand initially. It is different from Swedish, English, etc. It is spoken in a monotonous range. While pronouncing French, the nasal sounds that seem to have a similar sound actually do not have. A beginner or a preschooler needs to be versed in the fact that sounds appear to melt together from the previous syllable of a word to the beginning of next words syllable. Here animal sound, enacting of screenplay or voice modulation can be highly effective in preparing them to learn French in the future. 

These are minor but very handy things that may assist in learning the language effortlessly.  

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